They have a well-balanced sound that caters to all genres, with a good amount of bass and an accurate representation of the instruments and vocals in the mid-range. It's tight, well-controlled, and doesn't drown out any of the rest of the frequency response. It is more open and present and feels a bit more nuanced. Also, R.E.M.’s “How the West Was Won..” is an easy win for the LCD-3. The Ananda has a more intimate and warmer presentation, but we are not talking about huge differences. The $999 HIFIMAN Ananda-BT Bluetooth Over-Ear Planar Magnetic Headphone is something of a unicorn in the wireless headphone world. It is very light, and I find it comfortable enough, but I. miss the swivel action of previous models. Again, the Ananda is wider and more open sounding, but the Elear has a better sense of separation and dynamics. Nikes – Frank Ocean: The HD800 has more space, the Ananda has more warmth, but they are not miles apart. Despite feeling cheap, the removable cable still seems of high quality. They also have an excellent soundstage that will feel large and open. Unlike the Shangri-La Junior, the Ananda uses planar magnetic drivers instead of electrostatic ones. It has a wider soundstage. The CS300XS is a tad more delicious, and not at all less snappy and dynamic. The separation is better on the Ananda, the soundstage is wider. It is very light, and I find it comfortable enough, but I really miss the swivel action of previous models. The Elear is clearly more dynamic, darker and has tighter but sometimes more precise imaging. The Ananda has a more intimate and warmer presentation, but we are not talking about huge differences. Bass lands with some impact, but never seems too crazy or uncontrolled. Closing my eyes, the space around me seems spangled with detail, as each instrument calls out. The HiFiMan ANANDA-BT have a good bass accuracy. Today I’m sitting down to review the new Hifiman Ananda, taking a break from my usual regimen of trolling Bose fanboys online, or sending NSFW emails to John Grado. Again, more resolution and spaciousness with the Ananda. Young Vivald – Modo Antiquo: Same thing with the strings, Ananda is probably the classical listeners preferred choice. The rest of the bass range is well-balanced, so it can reproduce the boom and punch from your favorite songs accurately. The Jotunheim and Liberty are both good, and quite similar to the Ananda. Now, the Ananda slams almost just as hard as the Sundara and is still generally more resolving across the spectrum. Bass and mids aren’t as full or present in the HE-560 and it shows less warmth and smoothness. The HE560 and Ananda have many great qualities in common. Hifiman Ananda Home. Mid-bass is much better represented and realistically from about 200Hz up, linearity is very good. Also, R.E.M.’s “How the West Was Won..” is an easy win for the LCD-3. Wireless audio is the new thing in personal audio these days. Both play well with both amp the Audio-gd Master 9 and the Woo WA22, but especially the HE560 becomes more fun on the WA22, which energizes the mids a bit. It has 3.5 mm mono-plug detachable cables, which seems to be the new standard for Hifiman, as they have abandoned the fragile 2.5 mm plugs. Hifiman At 14 ounces (399 grams) it's a bit heavier than average for high-end headphones, and impedance is rated at an easy-to-drive 25 ohms. Compared to the HE1000 v2, I just find the HE1000 v2 better: More resolution, better balanced, more extension. Although I think there’s more to come for Hi-Fi level of sound, the wireless technology has already reached to a good level in ter… Present but not too forward, and at times seemingly melding with the natural warmth of the low end, the Ananda’s midrange remains detailed and clean. For seasoned audiophiles and newcomers alike, the Ananda offers a stunning option that cannot fail to please. But the Sundara holds up quite well. Forums. Vicente Amigo´s dynamic guitar in “Tres Notas Para Decir Te Quiero” sounds marvelous on the G103P, as it did on amplifiers costing manyfold its modest price. In many ways, the HE1000 v2´s presentation is not very different from the Ananda´s. The specs reveal a headphone that offers a very wide frequency response, as well as a low nominal impedance. But the trend is similar to before. : The sound signature between the two headphones is not dissimilar. The Ananda requires a tad more volume on the amp, but not much. I wouldn’t call it harsh, sibilant, grainy, or artificial. My impression that the Sundara hits harder, but with less detail and nuance still holds: The Sundara slams a lot harder, but loses the finer detail of the Ananda. Now, going totally budget with the Ananda is not nearly as bad as one could expect. The Ananda is not lost at all with the small black box. Bass and mid body of the HE-560 is also smaller than that of the Ananda, and you get less impact. Take it slow – Little Hurricane: Oh, the LCD-X has this deliciously meaty presentation. They are priced at USD 999 and 1599 respectively. With regards to treble and bass, they are more similar, and generally level of detail feels similar. The more expensive Arya has it, but in the previous generation, even the least expensive headphones like the HE400S had swivel-action headbands. Of course, a good deal of that frequency range has to fall outside the range of normal human hearing; and yet, even in my test tracks, where other, brighter headphones might screech on violin strings, the Ananda seems a bit smoother. this brief comparison, I must say it is hard to pick a winner. The Ananda´s soundstage is again wider. Ananda is great too – just more intimate in its presentation. Amps used: Woo WA22 and Audio-gd Master 9. For this album I would probably turn to some more specialist headphones or IEMs to feel more of that bass. Following design cues from the Hifiman Edition X and HE1000, the Ananda features a plastic and aluminum yoke and headband, but offers classic Hifiman grills that arrest the gaze of even the snootiest audiophiles. Frequency Response:  8-55,000 Hz The two cables supplied with the Ananda are of an ultralight “wire inside tube”-design, very similar to that of the HE-1000 v2. The Jotunheim and Liberty are both good, and quite similar to the Ananda. But these cans are so differently tunes, that directly comparing them is hard. I immediately prefer the Ananda, it is lusher, its cleaner in the treble, or at least that’s how it feels like. The Ananda is brighter, with a wider soundstage, and tends to be nicer with vocals. For a neutral, spacious sound, though, there are few contenders at this price. Ananda is the culmination of years of development, lightweight, ultra-fine planar drivers at their heart sing with unmatched agility and power sensitivity. The Ananda has a great soundstage, reaches deep in the bass and has delicate highs. 1) Amplifier Cary SLI-80, Source Hegel HD25, Close Your Eyes – Eple Trio: I find them both to be very open and spacious, but the HD800 is still the king of  the open soundstage. Equipment Forums. Natural if a bit relaxed, this low end isn’t the kind of energetic, driving sound you would expect from the makers of the Edition X. Not that the Elear is not good, but my preference is clear. Bass extends all the way into the sub-bass without any drop-off. We now have good sounding wireless gear as a result, together with the modern Bluetooth codecs such as aptX HD and LDAC. They are quite different, but both are very good. I will review the Arya later. Like most open-back headphones, they lack a bit of low-bass, so you won't feel the deep thump from bass-heavy tracks. The Ananda is definitely a smoother ride with more micro detail. Now, let’s get on to the comparisons: Azzaharat – Eple Trio: The Ananda is smoother and more detailed, whilst the Sundara feels harder and coarser in direct comparison. Hifiman HE1000 mk1 vs mk2 / HE1000 v1 vs v2. They do not sound too far apart. The Ananda is a little bit more elevated in the bass, but mostly just in the sub-bass. The HIFIMAN Ananda is an orthodynamic over-ear headphone intended to be driven directly from portable equipment but can also be driven from most desktop gear. They are 1.5 m and 3 m long, with a standard 3.5 mm and 6.35 mm plug respectively. The differences remain, but in a way that makes preference more of a toss-up. Hifiman is known for its big, planar magnetic headphones, and the Ananda-BT is a dedicated Bluetooth version which retails for $999 US. I find the HD800 to sound a bit drier. Comparing my two favorite amps for the Ananda turns out to be somewhat of a tie. The background blackness is also blacker with the LCD-3. I really like my Oppo PM1, but must admit that the only clear advantage it has on the Ananda is comfort and fit. Concluding this brief comparison, I must say it is hard to pick a winner. LEARN ABOUT BASS ACCURACY Both have a nice and present warm midrange. I also compared the two DAC/Amps I had at hand using the Ananda. All in all, they are both great. Bright at times, the overall impression here is one of rolled-off highs – an impression that seems at odds with the stated frequency range of these cans. Almost Like the Blues – Cohen: Again, two different presentations that are easy for me to like, but I tend to prefer the Ananda. It is slightly less up front. The Ananda is sometimes warmer and lusher in the midrange, has some more of that bloom, and a special kind of sweetness. HiFiMAN Ananda Brand New Description "The HiFiMAN Ananda has one of the most ideal frequency response curves for a wide range of music, coupled with excellent detail retrieval, speed, and imaging. He's a huge fan of Grado, UK hip hop, and the English Language in general. In conclusion I do prefer the Liberty for the Ananda. Going on to some string music, the two solid-state amps seems to present more of that nice and dry texture, but I still love the Leben. However, the dynamics of the Sundara is great fun. The sheer level of detail and musicality present in such a neutral sound signature does much to recommend the Ananda – and not only to those who prefer a relatively reference-oriented headphone. Again, two different presentations that are easy for me to like, but I tend to prefer the Ananda. The Ananda wins in midrange presence and amplifier sensitivity, the HE560 is to me a lot more comfortable and has better deep bass. Though my giant ears could fit inside the cups with ease, the Ananda’s cups still seemed a bit too large. Amplifier: Leben CS300XS, Source: Mytek Liberty DAC. Simply put, the Ananda is a lot fuller and richer in the upper bass and in the mid-range. The HE-6 gets even tighter and more dynamic with the more powerful Cary SLI-80. His completely subjective judgement will ensure that readers will leave this website even more confused than they were when they arrived. For lovers of soundstage, the headroom here lands nothing short of amazing, with the Ananda quenching any audiophile’s lust for three-dimensional music. Not that the Elear is not good, but my preference is clear. It depends on the track, though. When I try them both with the Cary SLI-80. Fly Forward – Higdon/Hahn: This track sounds much better with the Ananda, the relaxed and detailed presentation gives it a sense of flow that the Sundara cannot match. The Maze – Hofseth, Eilertsten et.al. The Ananda BT use very same driver than Hifiman Ananda, which is a big rectangular planar driver with ultra-thin Neo ”supernano” diaphragm that is 80% thinner than older models than Sundara. It is lighter sounding and more effortless with the delicate instruments. While not as low as Hifiman's HE-500 and Audeze's LCD-2 rev. Honestly, though, as much as this might sound like a negative, I actually prefer the rolled off character. There are headphones that dig even a bit deeper in the bass, there are headphones that feel even a bit more snappy and dynamic. The Ananda seems to me to be something of a combination of the LCD-3 and HD800. I much prefer both the old HE-500 and the more recent HE-560 headband arrangements, which both feel more solid and allows for the before mentioned full swivel action. High sensitivity allows use with virtually any smartphone or portable audio device. Midnight City – M83: Another song that benefits the Ananda due to the warmer mids and the more present midbass. I find it hard to pick a winner. The difference in slam is to some degree leveled out by the WA22 (I believe the Master 9 was being held back because I didn’t use the balanced output). The HIFIMAN Ananda-BT has almost the same design as its wired version. In fact, in my opinion it can sometimes sound ever so slightly hot around 9-10k and above. The midrange of the Ananda is very sweet and to me something special. A couple of exceptions are the Focal Utopia and the HiFiMan Ananda, the latter of which we will discuss today. Still sporting the same 3.5 mm dual-entry connection to the headphone, the cable seems lighter and thus a little cheaper than its predecessors. Vocals are more open sounding, in a nice and smooth way. It is also quite forward sounding, so when switching headphones, I need to get adjusted to its more energetic playing style. Unlike the Shangri-La Junior, the Ananda uses planar-magnetic drivers instead of electrostatic ones. Especially noticeable with Vicente Amigo’s flamenco guitar (Ciudad des las Ideas), where the LCD-3 simply is marvelous. Except for the added midbass presence of the Ananda, they sound quite similar on this track. The tonal balance of the Ananda reminds me a bit of the HE-500, which I unfortunately parted with before this review. As much as I like the HE560, I must say I immediately find it a bit lacking in mid presence, and this is very obvious in direct comparison to the Ananda. I want to thank Duet.no for providing the review sample. The separation is better on the Ananda, the soundstage is wider. I immediately prefer the Ananda, it is lusher, its cleaner in the treble, or at least that’s how it feels like. The Ananda is marketed as an easy to drive full-size headphone, and with a rated efficiency of 103 dB and an impedance of 25 ohms, it certainly seems to be more suited for semi-portable/lightweight systems than most of Hifiman’s previous offerings, which usually needs quite a lot of power sound at their best. Especially noticeable with Vicente Amigo’s flamenco guitar (Ciudad des las Ideas), where the LCD-3 simply is marvelous. I find it really hard to prefer one over the other, but they are different. The bass is heavier and more physical. Sound. The upper mids and voices in the Ananda are also more forward and aggressive compared to … Stretching G – BHZ: This slow improvisation is delicious with both. The more up-front sound of the Oppo is nice and engaging, but if I could have the Ananda sound in the PM1 housing, I would not hesitate. It retails for around € 1000.- which is still quite a lot of money for a headphone. Otherwise, they feel equally good, but again, the HD800 treble a bit dry in comparison. Delicate and refined, the soundstage on the Ananda offers masterfully-executed placement and depth. It has an open soundstage and high resolution. Playing Stanko´s “, the cymbals are a bit crisper with the Brooklyn, there is a tiny bit more space around instruments, a bit more snappiness. , the Liberty is slightly more open, but the rounder feeling Jotunheim is not bad at all. The Ananda is brighter, with a wider soundstage, and tends to be nicer with vocals. The thicker tone and slight lack of fine detail that held the HE500 back a bit are exchanged for lightness and transparency. Haydn/Berio – Alban Berg Quartet: The Ananda is fatter and warmer in the midrange, but without sounding less detailed. The Ananda comes out a tad cleaner and airier here as well. As a replacement to older Hifiman designs, though, this cable seems less likely to kink or tangle, and that can only be better for the actual wiring inside. But most striking is the superb mid-range. For all the nice buzzwords, please check out Hifiman’s own descriptions. But all things considered, I find the Ananda offers the best sound for the money of the Hifiman headphones mentioned here. The Ananda comes out as a bit brighter overall. the Sennheiser HD650 or the Oppo PM1, you might not be as happy about the Ananda as I am. The HE560 has a tremendous bass – and so does the Ananda. I generally find the Liberty an especially good match for Sundara, and comparing the two headphones on the Liberty reinforces that impression, as I find the difference between the two headphones are less apparent than with the previous amplifiers. Except for the added midbass presence of the Ananda, they sound quite similar on this track. The Ananda has Edition X/HE-1000-style ear shaped ear cups and Sundara-style headband. The bass is more textured, tighter and reaches deeper with the HE-6. Terminal 7 – Tomasz Stanko: Again, more resolution and spaciousness with the Ananda. Don’t get me wrong, they are easy to tell apart, but not in that shockingly striking way that you experience when going from HD800 to LCD-3, or that I experienced comparing the Ananda to the LCD-X. But the Ananda’s midrange presentation is in a different league. Neither of these is a bass cannon. HIFIMAN Ananda . I get the sense the Sundara excels at the big dynamics, the Ananda excels at micro-dynamics, to put it that way. In conclusion, the preference for LCD-3 of Ananda seems to depend on the amplifier. Like the Shangri-La Junior, HiFiMan’s open-back Ananda uses an extremely thin, lightweight driver membrane. Playing Yazz Ahmed´s “. When I try them both with the Cary SLI-80. This slow improvisation is delicious with both. Same thing with the strings, Ananda is probably the classical listeners preferred choice. ... Everything is placed amazingly right at the scale from deepest bass to airy highs. Homesick – Airbag: This song sets them apart more than before. Playing Stanko´s “Terminal 7” the cymbals are a bit crisper with the Brooklyn, there is a tiny bit more space around instruments, a bit more snappiness. The bass is heavier and more physical. I immediately find the Questyle warmer sounding than the Master 9, it is, without doubt, a bit thicker in its midrange presentation – and it sounds really good. The Ananda has more midrange presence, very noticeable with the double bass solo in the track “Blue”, but all along the album, the Ananda has a significantly warmer presentation. Therefore, the design is a little inferior as compared to other headphones in the $1,000 price range. While utilizing the usual Hifiman planar magnetic drivers, the Ananda debuts a new interchangeable cable. When not testing audio equipment or writing, you'll find him taking photographs or fiddling with circuit boards. These are two very different headphones, yet still, the Ananda manages to sound not too different from either. Vocals are more present and less distant. HiFiMAN Jade II ($2499 including amp) vs. HiFiMAN Ananda-BT Trio in C op 87 – Beethoven / Les Vents Francais: With this nice wind instruments trio the Ananda has the upper hand. The Ananda is more open, spacious and light on the touch. The HiFiMan Ananda headphones deliver stunning audio performance, providing a superb sense of space and detail. The Maze – Bendik Hofseth et.al: The Ananda has more midrange presence, very noticeable with the double bass solo in the track “Blue”, but all along the album, the Ananda has a significantly warmer presentation. Even the little G103P – which brings me a long way into Ananda-heaven. I find the HD800 to sound a bit drier. Save me – Röyksopp: The Ananda is more detailed and controlled in the bass region. Compared to the HE560, Ananda takes a lot of the great qualities from the older sibling, adds some midrange presence, and requires a lot less of the amplifier. There aren’t too many wireless open-back audiophile headphones out there, especially full-blown Planar Magnetic models. But for me, having a sweet, slightly pronounced midrange reminiscent of the HD650, but with more resolution, wider and deeper soundstage as well as great bass- and treble extension, is a fabulous thing. The Sundara feels more dynamical, it slams harder. HiFiMAN says the Ananda, with its high 103dB sensitivity and 25-Ohm impedance, can be driven directly by most smartphones, and for convenience, the first thing I tried it with. Of course, how much this will be a drawback, will vary from user to user., and for most users it would not be a deal breaker. Detail and resolution seem to be on a similar level, even though they are more obvious on the brighter Ananda. It is slightly less up front. Now, the Ananda slams almost just as hard as the Sundara and is still generally more resolving across the spectrum. Even though it in many ways feels like a crossover between the HD800 and the LCD-3, the warm mid-range is more reminiscent of Sennheiser HD650 and Oppo PM-1, just with more resolution. 4:30 am – Solveig Slettahjell: Time for some female vocals: The Ananda is a bit less thick in the mids, the vocals are very present and delicious, yet have more room to breathe, more detail and texture. The HE560 still has its place, though. The Sundara feels more dynamical, it slams harder. The Ananda’s treble by contrast is definitely brighter. They are similarly easy to on the amplification needs, although the PM1 is slightly easier. Fans of bass would do well to consider the Edition X V2. The bass and drums hit harder and feel more dynamic with the Elear,: There is no doubt that this track plays to the Elear´s stronger sides. The planar magnetic Hifiman Ananda is one of two models that take over the style, looks and price/performance profile of the Himan Edition X-models. The LCD-X is thicker in its presentation. The two cables supplied with the Ananda are of an ultralight “wire inside tube”-design, very similar to that of the HE-1000 v2. Otherwise, they feel equally good, but again, the HD800 treble a bit dry in comparison.

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